Faulty Traffic Signal In OC Likely Led To Pedestrian Collision

OCEAN CITY — A malfunctioning traffic signal at 17th Street could have contributed to a pedestrian-vehicle collision on Tuesday afternoon.

Around 12:15 p.m. on Tuesday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a reported vehicle-pedestrian collision at 17th Street and Philadelphia Avenue. The pedestrian was transported by Ocean City EMS to TidalHealth Peninsula Regional with minor injuries. The OCPD Traffic Safety Unit is still investigating the collision. All southbound traffic on Philadelphia Avenue was redirected to St. Louis Avenue for about 40 minutes.

The traffic signal at 17th Street was set to flashing at the time of the collision. Ocean City Communications notified the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) around 9:25 a.m. on Tuesday about the outage at the signal at 17th Street and Philadelphia Avenue. After the midday collision, Ocean City Communications again notified SHA to determine when the signal would be repaired, according to police reports.

With assistance from the town’s public works department, OCPD officers blocked traffic from east to west at 17th Street. OCPD officers remained on the scene to assist with vehicle and pedestrian traffic at the intersection until SHA crews arrived at 2:30 p.m. As of 3 p.m., the traffic signals at 17th were restored to normal function.

The OCPD is reminding motorists and pedestrians to use extreme caution when approaching an intersection with a non-functioning traffic signal. When approaching a flashing yellow traffic signal, slow down and proceed with caution. Pedestrians are advised to wait for significant breaks in motor vehicle traffic before crossing, or safely walk to a fully-functioning light with a crosswalk at a different intersection.

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About The Author: Shawn Soper

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Shawn Soper has been with The Dispatch since 2000. He began as a staff writer covering various local government beats and general stories. His current positions include managing editor and sports editor. Growing up in Baltimore before moving to Ocean City full time three decades ago, Soper graduated from Loch Raven High School in 1981 and from Towson University in 1985 with degrees in mass communications with a journalism concentration and history.