Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

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The Ocean City Beach Patrol posed at Caroline Street in 1947 with their new torpedo-style life buoys. The Beach Patrol had returned to full force in 1946 following World War II and Bob Craig, center front, was appointed captain. He would continue in that position until 1987, a record of service unlikely to ever be broken.

The buildings in the background, from left, are the former Maryland Inn, famous for its food and hospitality, and the U.S. Coast Guard Station and the Showell block. The Coast Guard Station was moved to the southern end of the Boardwalk in 1977 where today it is the home of the Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum. The Showell block no longer exists but contained a bowling alley and Edwards 5 and 10 at the time of this photo.

Photo courtesy Lt. Ward Kovacs from the library of Captain Bob Craig

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

Many young Ocean City boys got their start in business selling newspapers in the years before CNN, Fox News and the Internet brought instant reporting to anyone with a television or smart phone. The cry of newsboys hawking their paper is a favorite memory of that long-age era. Baltimore papers, such as The Sun and the News-American, and Washington papers, … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

The original Morbid Manor was the ultimate “haunted house” with live actors portraying ghosts, goblins and ghouls of all shapes and sizes. It even featured a plane crash on the third floor of the spooky building located on the Fishing Pier at Wicomico Street and the beach. The screams of frightened visitors could be heard on the Boardwalk and across … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

The Midnight Football League was a popular activity for Ocean City’s summer workers in the late 1960s and the early 1970s. Young men from local establishments, such as Phillips Crab House, Frontier Town, the Ocean City Police Department and The Embers, played a rough and tumble brand of touch football for glory, beer and bragging rights. Held on Holland Island … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge has done more to boost tourism than any oth-er factor in Ocean City’s history. Opened on July 30, 1952, the Bay Bridge replaced the antiquated ferry system across the Chesapeake Bay and provided quick and easy access from the Western Shore for those visiting Ocean City. The town’s summer population doubled followed the opening of the … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

Rolling chairs were a familiar sight in Ocean City in 1920s and 1930s and were an early version of today’s Boardwalk tram. Many college students helped pay their tuition by pushing tourists up and down the Boardwalk in those wicker chairs on wheels. Rolling chairs originated in Atlantic City, N.J. and quickly made their way south. Dr. Francis Townsend, Sr. … Continue reading