Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

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A popular form of fishing that is affordable for the average fisherman is on a party boat or “head boat” (so-called because there is a flat charge per angler or “per head.”) These boats provide rods, reels and bait and a mate to untangle lines and help bring fish aboard.

One of the most famous was the “Question Mark,” which sailed from the dock at Wicomico Street beginning in 1951 captained by Gordon S. Patton. The “Question Mark” was the former Navy PT-139, which had been launched in September 1942 and assigned to the Motor Torpedo Squadron in Mellville, R.I. as part of the Navy’s training squadron.

As a party boat, the 80-foot long craft made two trips daily offshore at a cost of $4 “per head” and an evening cruise along the beachfront at twilight.

The “Question Mark” sand in the West Ocean City harbor in 1973 and now rests offshore in the Atlantic Ocean as part of an artificial reef.

Postcard from Bunk Mann’s collection

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

The Dinner Bell was a popular Ocean City restaurant in the years following World War II. Located on the southeast corner of 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue in the Monticello Hotel, it served homestyle cooking with an Eastern Shore flavor. Many still remember their delicious fresh baked rolls and fried chicken. The waitresses lived in a dormitory style room at … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

This historic picture depicts the birth of the current Inlet in August of 1933. The railroad tracks are visible as are the fish camps where the pound fishermen lived and worked prior to the Aug. 23 hurricane, which occurred prior to storms being named. Although the town suffered some serious property damage, there were no fatalities and the storm turned … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

Baltimore Avenue was Ocean City’s “Main Street” when this postcard was printed circa 1920. This view looks north from Wicomico Street and includes some of the town’s most historic structures. The building in the left foreground is the Seaside Hotel (built in 1876) and beyond it with the tall brick smokestack is the electric power plant. In the right foreground … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

Ocean City has suffered many devastating fires in its history, but none worse than “The Great Fire of 1925.” The fire began in the Power Plant on Baltimore Avenue around 7:30 a.m. and spread through several blocks of the downtown area on De. 29. The severe cold made firefighting difficult and water was drafted from holes cut in the ice … Continue reading