Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

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Much like the rise of the motel in the 1950s, the growth of condominiums in the 1970s changed the look and lifestyle of Ocean City.

The first high-rise condo — the High Point South — was built by John Whaley in 1970 and within three years a stretch of beach in North Ocean City had become known as the “Gold Coast.” Over a mile of tall buildings towered over the beach and more restaurants, bars and shops sprang up to meet this new generation of property owners.

By 1973, high interest rates, overbuilding and the gas crisis combined to burst the bubble and the glory days quickly ended. Banks failed, developers went broke and sales dropped dramatically. The real estate market would eventually recover but there has never been another building frenzy like the Gold Coast condo boom of the early ‘70s.

Photo by Bill Fuhrer

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

The Ocean City Beach Patrol posed at Caroline Street in 1947 with their new torpedo-style life buoys. The Beach Patrol had returned to full force in 1946 following World War II and Bob Craig, center front, was appointed captain. He would continue in that position until 1987, a record of service unlikely to ever be broken. The buildings in the … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

Many young Ocean City boys got their start in business selling newspapers in the years before CNN, Fox News and the Internet brought instant reporting to anyone with a television or smart phone. The cry of newsboys hawking their paper is a favorite memory of that long-age era. Baltimore papers, such as The Sun and the News-American, and Washington papers, … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

The original Morbid Manor was the ultimate “haunted house” with live actors portraying ghosts, goblins and ghouls of all shapes and sizes. It even featured a plane crash on the third floor of the spooky building located on the Fishing Pier at Wicomico Street and the beach. The screams of frightened visitors could be heard on the Boardwalk and across … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

The Midnight Football League was a popular activity for Ocean City’s summer workers in the late 1960s and the early 1970s. Young men from local establishments, such as Phillips Crab House, Frontier Town, the Ocean City Police Department and The Embers, played a rough and tumble brand of touch football for glory, beer and bragging rights. Held on Holland Island … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge has done more to boost tourism than any oth-er factor in Ocean City’s history. Opened on July 30, 1952, the Bay Bridge replaced the antiquated ferry system across the Chesapeake Bay and provided quick and easy access from the Western Shore for those visiting Ocean City. The town’s summer population doubled followed the opening of the … Continue reading