Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

vanishing 2-5

The English Diner opened in 1939 on the corner of Wicomico Street and Baltimore Avenue. Moved to 21st Street and Philadelphia Avenue in the last 1950s, it was one of Ocean City’s most popular family restaurants.

It was known as “Little City Hall” for the daily breakfast gatherings of Ocean City’s political elite during the years that Hugh Cropper, Harry Kelley and Roland “Fish” Powell served as mayors.

The English Diner was demolished in November 2005 and the Mariner’s Watch condominium was built on the site the following year.

Photo by Bunk Mann from Nov. 6, 2005

 

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

Boxing was once one of America’s most popular sports and Ocean City offered both amateur and professional fights in the late 1920s and 1930s. Captain W.B.S Powell — prominent businessman and former Ocean City mayor — was the local boxing promoter. Bouts were held in an outdoor arena between South Division Street and S. 1st Street in the area where … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

No, that’s not a scene from an early Cruisin weekend — it’s the original “State Roads Bridge,” a narrow two-lane span built to handle Ocean City’s automotive traffic in 1916. The bridge entered town at Worcester Street and was just a block north of the railroad’s trestle bridge that spanned the Sinepuxent Bay from the mainland to South Division Street. … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

Legendary developer James B. Caine built his summer home — known as “Crystal House” directly on the beach just north of the Carousel Hotel in 1968. The cottage featured a living room with a fountain in the middle, three bedrooms and three bathrooms with sunken tubs and square toilets. Built on pilings, the Crystal House extended into the surf during … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

During World War II, Ocean City’s nightclub scene was centered on 9th Street. Within a short block, Jackson’s Casino, the Blue Dahlia and the Beach Club provided music, dancing and a lively bar scene. Slot machines were everywhere and there was hardly a hotel, bar or restaurant that didn’t have several. Ocean City was still a small seasonal town in … Continue reading

Vanishing Ocean City With Bunk Mann

The Log House was one of the most unique buildings in Ocean City for nearly 40 years. Constructed on the southwest corner of 5th Street and Philadelphia Avenue in the late 1930s, the rooming house resembled a large cottage built of “Lincoln Logs.” The Log House went through several changes of ownership and was known as the “Pic O’Wenner Apartment … Continue reading