Busy Cruisin’ Weekend Launches Summer Season With Huge Crowds, Major Traffic Backups; City Officials, Promoter To Review Event

South Ocean City is pictured Saturday morning as Cruisin’ participants line up to enter the Inlet parking lot, one of the official event headquarters. Photo by Rally Rides/Howard Whaley

OCEAN CITY — A lively debate ensued among the business and residential sectors this week over the Cruisin’ event with critics maintaining it needs major changes and supporters welcoming it as one of the busiest times of the year.

Throughout the course of the weekend and early part of the week, Ocean City residents vented on social media their frustrations over massive traffic backups, infrastructure damage to roads caused by the thousands of classic cars in town spinning out and the massive amounts of litter left behind by irresponsible visitors. In fact, one long-time Ocean City resident described the event in a letter to the editor as “broken” and in need of massive changes before the town hosts it again.

“Why are these people allowed to flaunt our laws? We have an ordinance for noise (broken), an ordinance against public drinking (broken), an ordinance against speeding and reckless driving (broken), and an ordinance against illegal trailer parking (broken). I wouldn’t want to be the one to explain our hypocrisy to visitors charged with those same violations later on this summer,” wrote resident Gabriel Mancini. “The business of Ocean City, that is to say, our image, our “brand”, is suffering from this ill-planned, poorly executed event. How many people didn’t come down because of the Cruisers? How many people will never be back? This weekend was an embarrassment to the Town of Ocean City.”

Mancini challenged the council to conduct a thorough review of the event, which he does not want to see end.

“Stand up for the people who live here. No group event should impact the town at the expense of the people who call it home,” Mancini said. “If the cruisers want to come to Ocean City and obey our laws, we should welcome them … in March or April.”

One of the event’s producers, Bob Rothermel, a former tourism and special events director for the town, took exception to the negatives being hurled by community members at the Cruisin’ event, which had 3,300 registered vehicles this year.

“The event is not broken I can tell you that. It’s a fine event. I think the biggest problem that we have is it’s the biggest event at the start of the season. The town wakes up almost like being shot out of a cannon. I would venture to say like any event or any group of people 95 to 99 percent of the people are not the problem. There is a small majority who gives us some trouble. It’s those who have nothing to do with the event that causes the problems and give the event a bad name,” Rothermel said.

In the event registered participants were discovered to be causing trouble, Rothermel said his team revoked their registration credentials. He said his group controls what it can, but acknowledged much of the responsibility falls to the Ocean City Police Department.

“We want the police to have a heavy hand. We don’t want the event to go south. Knuckleheads will create problems for the masses. If you look at the Inlet parking lot, these people are members of AARP walking with their grandchildren or they are families with young children. It’s the perfect event for Ocean City, except it has to be managed in a way that I don’t think we are capable of doing,” he said. “We can’t enforce the streets, but we do what we can to keep an eye on the participants. We can’t control those who are not part of the event and come down here to create havoc. That’s where the problem lies.”

Although detractors of the weekend made their displeasure known this week, on the flip side were multiple posts on the Facebook page of Cruisin’ and others indicated the police were too strict and ruined the weekend’s fun for participants.

Ocean City Communications Manager Jessica Waters said the city will always rule on the site of caution when it comes to public safety.

“There are certainly some people on both sides of the fence in regards to how the event went. The emails I was getting was that our police department was overzealous with their enforcement. Our opinion as a town is safety and cleanliness is our number one priority, so our police department while some might feel are overzealous, their job is to make sure everyone is safe here in Ocean City,” she said. “Cruiser week can be a traffic event with a lot of cars on the roadway and their priority is to make sure everyone that is on the road is being safe and following all of the rules.”

Rothermel said he will be meeting with Mayor Rick Meehan and City Manager David Recor next week to review the event. He said this is not conducted every year, but in light of concerns expressed he wants to make sure the city and the special event are on the same proverbial page.

“Already, we have 1,000 cars signed up for next spring’s event. Ocean City is the perfect destination for the event,” Rothermel said. “What we want to do is create an economic impact and maintain our welcome by stimulating business everywhere. I want to make sure [at this meeting] that we are still welcome and doing everything we can to be a corporate citizen of the town. The summer season starts with Cruisin’ now, not Memorial Day. In many cases, I hear Cruisin’ weekend is better than Memorial Day weekend and even the 4th of July. It’s not all about profit, but it has become the economic engine that kicks off the summer season. We have to realize this is a resort. It’s not a retirement community. Business is going to have to happen for us to enjoy the community that we live in.”

Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association (OCHMRA) Executive Director Susan Jones views some of the perceived problems from the weekend as representative of the changes in society and culture.

“The offenders are the big old pickup trucks blowing black smoke everywhere. It’s almost like the VW takeover in September with the big truck groups … I think they were the big offenders,” Jones said. “I don’t think Cruisin’ itself is the problem. I think it’s the way social media is impacting tourism. Social media has impacted travelers’ vacations today. It’s today’s youth not being raised the way we were. It’s society changing and the visitor of today is much different than those of 25 years ago.”

G. Hale Harrison of the Harrison Group, a company that operates 10 hotels and 10 restaurants in Ocean City, echoed the sentiments from Rothermel and Jones that the concerns over Cruisin’ are rooted in the non-event participants. He said it would behoove town and police officials to focus on the other groups not affiliated with Cruisin’ because his perspective is they are causing a majority of the problems.
“There are other events that are falling on the same dates that are being confused by the public with Cruisin’. The big trucks and the mustangs come on that weekend and they are not part of Cruisin’. They are separate and I don’t think it’s essential to the business community. The hotels will be full just with Cruisin’. These other events have just sprung up in the last year or two and they do cause more problems,” Harrison said. “The city can make an impact without hurting businesses by looking into those events and the dates they come.”

According to Waters, the chief complaint that disturbs her is the aspect of how dirty the resort appeared at various times of the weekend from reckless visitors.

“I have talked to a lot of people who have come down for the event, and people who live here, and like I said from the local standpoint it’s that they are just disturbed people are coming here being so disrespectful by throwing trash everywhere. That is very upsetting for us,” she said. “We have an amazing Public Works Department who works really, really hard to make sure Ocean City looks spic and span. That is unacceptable, and we are certainly the first people to say that is unacceptable, and that is definitely going to be on our after action report as we head into next year to make sure the same thing doesn’t happen again. No one wants to see Ocean City disrespected and have trash thrown anywhere in our town, especially when we all work so hard to keep it so clean. There is definitely going to be some discussion moving forward as to how we can prevent that type of thing from happening again.”

Jones understands a discussion may be held between Cruisin’ promoters and the city about moving the event to April, but she said that’s unlikely to happen for practical reasons.

“The only problem is it would have to be mid-April because it takes 10 days to set up the tents for Springfest. In addition, if it’s mid-April, you are not going to have enough hotel rooms open, and Cruisin’ fills the hotels rooms, absolutely,” Jones said.

Harrison, current president of the OCHMRA, cautioned the city and Cruisin’ about any discussion of changing the event dates in the future.

“May weekends, aside from Cruisin’ and Memorial Day, are not particularly strong from a business standpoint. Losing Cruisin’ would be disastrous to the business community. It’s as strong as Memorial Day weekend. Our season is short enough already and losing one of the prime weekends would be painful. Any event can be refined and improved and looking into how we can improve it for residents, participants and businesses is certainly a worthy effort,” Harrison said. “We are talking about killing a golden goose so we have to be really careful there.”

Waters could not confirm whether a date change request was being considered by the city at this point.
“Cruiser weekend has done a really good job in the past 24 years and has been a really successful event. A lot of people that come for the event are really here to show off their pride in their vehicles but unfortunately there are people that come who don’t necessarily have those intentions,” Waters said. “While they have been around for a long time, sometimes it might be time to make a change and what has worked in past years might not be working anymore. I would assume before next year’s event or before the fall event, there is going to be a conversation with the city manager and the Mayor and Council to determine how we are not going to run into those same problems, and how we are going to make changes to improve the quality of the event and the quality of Ocean City for our residents and our visitors.”

 

 

 

 

 

Berlin Elderly Couple Mourned After Murder-Suicide

Berlin Police and WCBI members are pictured outside the home of Lester and Ada Wright on Wednesday morning. Photo by Steve Green

BERLIN — An elderly couple’s apparent planned murder-suicide shocked many in the Berlin community this week, but many found comfort in their memories of the long-time residents.

Early Wednesday morning, around 8, the Berlin Police Department received a call in reference to a shooting. Along with Berlin officers, the Worcester County Bureau of Investigation (WCBI) responded to the scene at 603 Williams Street as well as the Maryland State Police Homicide Unit.

Worcester County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Ed Schreier confirmed at noon on Wednesday that authorities believe the male resident of the house, Lester Wright, 89, shot his wife, Ada, 90, and then attempted to kill himself. Lester Wright was found alive on the scene and was reportedly speaking to first responders before dying a short time later at PRMC in Salisbury.

“They are investigating this as a suspected murder-suicide. A female was shot twice. The male had what appeared to be three self-inflicted gunshot wounds. He was transported to PRMC and died at PRMC. She was found deceased in the residence,” Schreier said. “It’s still currently being investigated.”

Schreier said part of the probe is determining a possible motive for the incident.

“At this point in time, we do not have any of that information,” Schreier said.  “We can’t speculate as to the reason why at this point.”

While the official investigation continues, knowledge sources and acquaintances of the couple are grieving. Many community members hope the couple will be remembered for the lives they lived rather than simply the ending.

Lester Wright, 89, and Ada “Midge” Wright, 90, purchased their Berlin home in 1965, according to land records. Lester Wright was a former auto dealership owner on Old Ocean City Blvd, and Ada “Midge” Wright spent 25 years working at The Moore Companies, a landscaping business based in Berlin off Broad Street.

According to sources close to the Wrights, the couple was in the process of selling their home, which was meticulously kept inside and outside. A settlement was planned on Thursday with the property being purchased by well-known residential and commercial property owner Ernie Gerardi. The couple was expected to move to an assisted living facility on Friday.

Berlin Mayor Gee Williams knew the Wrights practically his entire life. He grew up next to their dealership on Old Ocean City Blvd. and has fond memories of them as a child as well as an adult.

“I am proud to say I knew them since I was a kid. Mr. and Mrs. Wright were just as nice as any folks you would ever want to meet,” Williams said. “My first vehicle that Betsy and I ever bought came from Mr. and Mrs. Wright. It’s kind of a misnomer to say they were a ‘childless’ couple. In reality, they knew young people all over this town, and were extremely well thought of by kids. The kids would come into their dealership, and Mr. and Mrs. Wright always embraced them, letting them get in and out of the cars on the lot … The last time I saw them was over the Christmas holidays at the Atlantic Hotel. You could see they were in failing health, but they were very positive, and that’s the way I am going to remember them.”

Rather than focus on the means in which the couple ended their lives, Williams said he will focus in the days and weeks ahead on his many memories of the Wrights while they were alive.

“Personally, as much as I’m hurt by the loss, the way they chose to leave this life is something that’s really between them and God,” Williams said. “None of us can put ourselves in their shoes. We don’t know what physical or psychological issues they were having to deal with. I think we should remember them for the way they lived, rather than the way they died.”

Another friend of the Wrights’ wishing to remain anonymous summed up their deaths this week as “a classic Romeo and Juliet love story.”

 

Berlin Couple Mourned Day After Murder-Suicide

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BERLIN — An elderly couple’s apparent planned murder-suicide shocked many in the Berlin community this week, but many are finding comfort in their memories of the long-time residents.

Early Wednesday morning, around 8, the Berlin Police Department received a call in reference to a shooting. Along with Berlin officers, the Worcester County Bureau of Investigation (WCBI) responded to the scene at 603 Williams Street as well as the Maryland State Police Homicide Unit.

Worcester County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Ed Schreier confirmed at noon on Wednesday that authorities believe the male resident of the house, Lester Wright, 89, shot his wife, Ada, 90, and then attempted to kill himself. Lester Wright was found alive on the scene and was reportedly speaking to first responders before dying a short time later at PRMC in Salisbury.

“They are investigating this as a suspected murder-suicide. A female was shot twice. The male had what appeared to be three self-inflicted gunshot wounds. He was transported to PRMC and died at PRMC. She was found deceased in the residence,” Schreier said. “It’s still currently being investigated.”

Schreier said part of the probe is determining a possible motive for the incident.

“At this point in time, we do not have any of that information,” Schreier said.  “We can’t speculate as to the reason why at this point.”

While the official investigation continues, knowledge sources and acquaintances of the couple are grieving. Many community members hope the couple will be remembered for the lives they lived rather than simply the ending.

Lester Wright, 89, and Ada “Midge” Wright, 90, purchased their Berlin home in 1965, according to land records. Lester Wright was a former auto dealership owner on Old Ocean City Blvd, and Ada “Midge” Wright spent 25 years working at The Moore Companies, a landscaping business based in Berlin off Broad Street.

According to sources close to the Wrights, the couple was in the process of selling their home, which was meticulously kept inside and outside. A settlement was planned on Thursday with the property being purchased by well-known residential and commercial property owner Ernie Gerardi. The couple was expected to move to an assisted living facility on Friday.

Berlin Mayor Gee Williams knew the Wrights practically his entire life. He grew up next to their dealership on Old Ocean City Blvd. and has fond memories of them as a child as well as an adult.

“I am proud to say I knew them since I was a kid. Mr. and Mrs. Wright were just as nice as any folks you would ever want to meet,” Williams said. “My first vehicle that Betsy and I ever bought came from Mr. and Mrs. Wright. It’s kind of a misnomer to say they were a ‘childless’ couple. In reality, they knew young people all over this town, and were extremely well thought of by kids. The kids would come into their dealership, and Mr. and Mrs. Wright always embraced them, letting them get in and out of the cars on the lot … The last time I saw them was over the Christmas holidays at the Atlantic Hotel. You could see they were in failing health, but they were very positive, and that’s the way I am going to remember them.”

Rather than focus on the means in which the couple ended their lives, Williams said he will focus in the days and weeks ahead on his many memories of the Wrights while they were alive.

“Personally, as much as I’m hurt by the loss, the way they chose to leave this life is something that’s really between them and God,” Williams said. “None of us can put ourselves in their shoes. We don’t know what physical or psychological issues they were having to deal with. I think we should remember them for the way they lived, rather than the way they died.”

Another friend of the Wrights’ wishing to remain anonymous summed up their deaths this week as “a classic Romeo and Juliet love story.”

 

Probe Confirms Man Entered Rectory On Fire; Reverend Dies In Church Fire; ‘He Was An Excellent Preacher’

The fire is pictured before first responders arrived. Photo by Michael Lawson

OCEAN CITY — While area residents mourn the loss of a pillar in the religious community, an ongoing investigation has confirmed a man entered an Ocean City church rectory on fire Tuesday morning.
The three-alarm fire at the rectory of the St. Paul’s by the Sea Episcopal Church occurred Tuesday around 9:25 a.m. when Ocean City Communications was alerted to a fire at St. Paul’s by the Sea Episcopal Church, specifically its rectory located along Baltimore Ave. near 3rd Street. Flames were found emanating from the rectory building when crews arrived.
Although authorities continue to probe the blaze and its cause, early indications are foul play was involved on some level and that one of the individuals who died is responsible for the blaze. That much was confirmed by the Ocean City Fire Department investigation on Wednesday in a statement.

The scene on Baltimore Avenue on Tuesday morning is shown. Photo by Chris Parypa

The scene on Baltimore Avenue on Tuesday morning is shown. Photo by Chris Parypa

“The initial investigation determined that the fire originated in the area of the ground floor pantry and porch space of the Shepherd’s Crook facility, which is located in the rectory building.  The exact cause of the fire is still actively under investigation, however; preliminary findings by investigators indicate that John Raymond Sterner, 56, of Ocean City, entered the structure with a significant amount of fire on and about his person, quickly spreading the fire to the structure. Investigators suspect an accelerant was involved in the quick spread of the fire, which claimed the life of Sterner.”
The fire was quickly brought under control, but Sterner was immediately confirmed to be dead. His body was left inside the structure until the fire was extinguished, and paramedics tended to the two victims treated on the scene for life-threatening injuries, one of which was transported to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center where she remains as of this afternoon. Her identity has not been confirmed.
The other injured victim was the church’s pastor, Rev. David A. Dingwall, who has been with the church since 2005. Dingwall was reportedly in his office on the second floor of the rectory when the fire occurred. He was found unconscious by firefighters and paramedics who reported heavy smoke and heat conditions.
Dingwall was treated on the scene and immediately hospitalized at Atlantic General Hospital. He was in stable condition as of 2:15 p.m., according to the Episcopal Diocese of Easton. However, later in the day, the Episcopal Diocese of Easton released a statement, saying, “It is with great sadness that we share with you that our brother in Christ, the Rev. David Dingwall, has died. Rest eternal grant to him, O Lord, and may light perpetual shine upon him.”
Later, AGH confirmed his death, reporting in a statement, “On behalf of the family, we are authorized to release that Father David Dingwall died this evening with family at his bedside. The family thanks everyone for their prayers and continued respect for their privacy at this time.”
The bodies of Dingwall and Sterner have been transferred to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for Maryland to determine exact causes of death, according to the city.
The lone survivor, as of Wednesday, was a female. She was seen exiting the rectory and was afire. A nearby witness reportedly helped extinguish the fire on her person. City Hall employees reportedly saw the woman exit the rectory, and grief counseling has reportedly been offered to them, according to a city official.
Police are investigating the matter currently and interviewing people with knowledge of the situation.
Sterner, who has in the past faced a number of criminal charges, ranging from open container and disturbing the peace to assault and burglary, was reportedly a frequent visitor to the Shepherd’s Crook, a food pantry and clothing store that operates out of the ground floor of the rectory and helps the needy and homeless. The fire originated in the Shepherd’s Crook, which was to open at 10 a.m. on Tuesday.
The Fire Marshal’s Office and the Ocean City Police Department’s Criminal Investigation Division are asking anyone with information about the fire to call 410-723-6610.
According to the OCFD, major fire damage was sustained to the rectory, while only minor damage was reported to the church’s worship center and the Red Room Community Center.
“Today was a very tragic day for our community,” said Ocean City Fire Chief Chris Larmore.  “We are thankful for the numerous agencies that assisted us during our response and especially thankful for all of the public safety personnel who helped prevent this fire from claiming more lives.”
A prayer service was held Wednesday, Nov. 27 at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church to offer prayers of comfort, healing and support for the congregation, families, and victims of the tragic fire.
Dingwall’s loss has led to an outpouring of personal reflections on social media sites in the community as well as an online effort at giveforward.com has been initiated to help the church raise money for future expenses associated with the fire.
Ocean City Recreation and Parks Director Tom Shuster, a member of the church, was on the scene of the fire on Tuesday. Shuster is a past senior warden with the church who worked closely with Dingwall on church business.

Connor Braniff is pictured outside the rectory. Photo by Chris Parypa

Connor Braniff is pictured outside the rectory. Photo by Chris Parypa

“To be honest with all that was going through my mind in the aftermath of the fire, it never really dawned on me that he would die. In my mind, I felt he would survive …,” Shuster said.
After appearing at City Hall for a Mayor and Council meeting, Shuster and his wife were at the hospital when Dingwall passed away. He said he was able to speak with Dingwall’s wife, Brenda, and two of their sons.
“We were able to embrace them and give our best wishes after she came out from the room he was in. Our Bishop was there as well so there was a lot of support there for the family. It was truly a shock for all of us,” Shuster said.
The loss was still a stinger for Shuster on Wednesday as he reflected on Dingwall’s professional and personal contributions.
“He worked to connect his family life with his parish life. One of the joys he had was that his son, Ian, was able to join him at church on Sundays, serving as an acolyte … that was a great joy for him to have his son there with him at the worship service.  The congregation enjoyed their interaction,” he said. “Due to my capacity with the church, I got to know him on a behind-the-scenes operational nature with the church. I enjoyed working with him. He was very engaged with his family and coaching his son in soccer down in Snow Hill. He was an excellent preacher. He was very thoughtful man and very enlightening with the way he preached to our parish. He was very, very attentive to members of our community who were sick and ill. He was able to reach out to those people and tended to their needs.”

UPDATED: Fatal Fire In Ocean City Claims Church Reverend; Probe Continues, Details Emerge

The scene today before first responders arrived. Photo by Michael Lawson

OCEAN CITY — A three-alarm fire at a landmark church rectory building is currently being investigated in Ocean City, while area residents mourn the loss of a pillar in their religious community.

Although authorities continue to probe the blaze and its cause, early indications are foul play was involved and that one of the individuals who died is responsible for the blaze.

Early Tuesday, Nov. 26 around 9:25 in the morning, Ocean City Communications was alerted to a fire at St. Paul’s by the Sea Episcopal Church, specifically its rectory located along Baltimore Ave. near 3rd Street. Flames were found emanating from the rectory building when crews arrived.

The fire was quickly brought under control, but one individual was immediately confirmed to be dead. The body was left inside the structure until the fire was extinguished, and paramedics tended to the two victims treated on the scene for life-threatening injuries, one of which was transported to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center where she remains as of this afternoon. Her identity has not been confirmed.

Sources confirm the other injured victim was the church’s pastor, Rev. David A. Dingwall, who has been with the church since 2005. He was hospitalized at Atlantic General Hospital and in stable condition as of 2:15 p.m., according to the Episcopal Diocese of Easton. However, earlier this evening, the Episcopal Diocese of Easton released a statement, saying, “It is with great sadness that we share with you that our brother in Christ, the Rev. David Dingwall, has died. Rest eternal grant to him, O Lord, and may light perpetual shine upon him.”

Later, AGH confirmed his death, reporting in a statement, “On behalf of the family, we are authorized to release that Father David Dingwall died this evening with family at his bedside. The family thanks everyone for their prayers and continued respect for their privacy at this time.”

As to how the fire began, new information has shed some light on the situation. Multiple sources with knowledge of the fire have reported to The Dispatch that a man entered the rectory of the St. Paul’s By The Sea Episcopal Church this morning prior to the fire breaking out. Although the information is preliminary, reports are the individual was the source of the fire that damaged the rectory, located on Baltimore Avenue near 3rd Street.

The question is whether the local male, who died in the blaze, walked into the rectory already on fire or whether he set himself on fire once inside the building with the help of some sort of flammable liquid, such as lighter fluid or gasoline.

Once inside, the man reportedly had contact with a female, who was later seen exiting the rectory and was on fire. City Hall employees reportedly saw this woman and grief counseling has reportedly been offered to them, according to a city official.

Police are investigating the matter currently and interviewing people with knowledge of the situation.

The man in question is reportedly a frequent visitor to the Shepherd’s Crook, a food pantry and clothing store that operates out of the ground floor of the rectory and helps the needy and homeless. The fire originated in the Shepherd’s Crook, sources maintain.

An undisclosed amount of volunteers were reportedly preparing for today’s 10 a.m.-noon opening when the fire occurred. The “Crook”, as it is known, is located on the ground floor of the parish house, which suffered extensive damage throughout. The church itself was not damaged.

The Fire Marshal’s Office and the Ocean City Police Department’s Criminal Investigation Division are currently investigating the cause of the fire, which is unknown at this time. Anyone with information regarding the fire is asked to contact the Ocean City Police Department at 410-723-6610.

“Today was a very tragic day for our community,” said Ocean City Fire Chief Chris Larmore.  “We are thankful for the numerous agencies that assisted us during our response and especially thankful for all of the public safety personnel who helped prevent this fire from claiming more lives.”

The community is still reeling from this tragedy today, and a prayer service is being planned for tomorrow, Wednesday, Nov. 27 at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, 10301 Coast Hwy, Ocean City, to offer prayers of comfort, healing and support for the congregation, families, and victims of the tragic fire at St. Paul’s By The Sea Episcopal Church. Prayers will also be offered for the many volunteer fire fighters and others who responded to the crisis. The entire Ocean City community is invited to join in this offering of support for our sisters and brothers at St. Paul’s. Anyone with questions may call the church office at 410-524-7474.

For photos and video of the site, click over to www.facebook.com/thedispatchoc

 

 

Thoughts From The Publisher’s Desk

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The current petition effort to defund the performing arts center’s current financing structure, which comes at little to no fiduciary risk at all, continues to be a major talking point in Ocean City.
No matter how you feel about the size of the facility or its ability to land top drawing acts, the fact is the issue was researched extensively over several years and the recommendation was made, and two bodies of the Mayor and Council approved it. The fact two council bodies voted unanimously in support of the performing arts center merits consideration.
The council majority that currently controls most government decisions at the elected office level is comprised of Mayor Rick Meehan, Council President Lloyd Martin and Council members Doug Cymek, Dennis Dare, Mark Knight and Joe Mitrecic. Although reluctant to refer to themselves as a voting block, the fact is more often than not these six are on the same page, and Council members Brent Ashley and Margaret Pillas typically hold opposing views, particularly on tourism-related issues.
The former council majority, in power for two years from October 2010 to November 2012, was comprised of Jim Hall and Joe Hall, who both lost in the last election, and current Council members Ashley and Pillas. Both Ashley and Pillas are up for re-election next year, along with Martin.
All of these council members voted for this project under its current financial plan, and they did it multiple times. That’s noteworthy because these individuals rarely agree on anything, but they saw fit to approve on several occasions this project and the financing.
The current petition seeks to place a significant government decision before the ultimate stakeholders, the voters. That’s a move I almost always support. Fundamentally, I think the petition process is government accountability at its best, but this is the exception. There is too much at risk and the effort appears to be grounded in misinformation.
It was reassuring to hear half of the homes approached by one petitioner refused to sign the petition. The problem is many people will sign whatever comes to the door to get the person off the stoop. That’s a shame, and the only solace in those circumstances is the hope they signed their name wrong as far as election records indicate and that they are non-residents.
During the planning and studying phase, most concerns I heard about the proposed 1,200-seat performing arts auditorium was it was not big enough to attract major acts and be a true difference maker on local business. Additionally, there were concerns the addition of the center to the mix might lead existing customers to go elsewhere.
While concerns about whether it will bring top-name acts may be valid, and surely its small size is going to limit the potential scope of major bookings, the belief that current customers will look elsewhere has not been proven at all. There have been concerns about the uncertainty of what the construction will mean for next year, and I think an argument could be made the city should have been more proactive in addressing those concerns, but officials seem to have assuaged fears with success thus far. The cheerleading convention is an example. The cheerleading group expressed concerns about the construction timetable initially, but convention center officials were able to have a beneficial dialog that calmed worries.
Petition organizer Tony Christ intimated in an email to City Solicitor Guy Ayres late this week that he is considering abandoning the petition effort in the near future but needs some questions answered before coming to that conclusion. Later, he said he will continue the petition through the weekend and re-evaluate as time goes on. I hope he makes the right call and drops the petition drive. This is not a fight that needs to be pursued.
In the meantime, performing arts center supporters are beginning to circulate signs made encouraging residents, “Do Not Sign The Petition, Signing Will Cost You Millions Of $$$”. You should expect to see these red-and-white signs this weekend.

What’s going on with “Ping Pong Summer,” the independent movie filmed in Ocean City in September and October of 2012? Here’s an answer, according to the movie’s Facebook page.
“One year ago today, while the Hurricane Sandy terror was rising, Ping Pong Summer wrapped principal photography (at 2 a.m.). We promise that the movie will be landing in 2014 in some way, shape, or form — hopefully earlier than later — so thanks for being patient, everybody!”

Adventures Of Fatherhood

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It was a birthday party weekend.
As I stood in the makeshift town watching one son participate in a mock gunfight at Frontier Town and another bang on the door to an ice cream shop that was obviously closed, I couldn’t help but again reflect on how my life has changed.
There it was a Sunday afternoon around 2 and I found myself standing in the middle of Frontier Town’s theme park while a dozen or so kids took part in a mock gunfight about 50 yards away.
With Carson knocking on the ice cream shop door and Beckett engaged in a game of play shooting with his friends, I sneaked a look at my phone to see how the Ravens were faring. It was not good I quickly learned.
As I was trying to get more information as to how we were possibly down two touchdowns in the second quarter, I quickly realized Carson was standing nearby throwing dirt at me with one hand and putting some down his pants with the other. That caused me to drop my phone, sending him into a huge belly laugh.
There was once a time when the Ravens game dictated what I did on Sunday. I scheduled everything around being able to watch the game. I still think that way, but the reality is that never happens anymore. My kids’ social life demands often get in the way, and the fact the Ravens are playing is not even a consideration for alternative plans.
As soon as I saw the party invitation to the Frontier Town gathering a couple weeks ago, I checked to see when the Ravens game was that weekend. It was at the exact same time, as luck would have it, and I immediately began to wonder if the game would be on a television anywhere, although I didn’t hold out much hope of actually being able to follow it.
The party ended shortly before 4 and I tried listening to the game on the radio on the way home. That lasted about two minutes before I heard hysterical calls from the backseat, requesting that the volume be put on “Monsters, Inc.” instead.
We walked in the door at home with about four minutes left in the game and I was excited to see the end. Usually, I can convince my boys to watch bits and pieces of a game, so long as I explain what’s happening. That usually leads to conversations about why it’s called a touchdown, rather than a goal and a home run.
On this particular day, there would be no football game watching, as Carson wanted no part of it and all Beckett wanted to do was go outside and ride his scooter with his street friends.
Twenty-four hours earlier, we had another birthday party. This time the festivities took us to Chuck E. Cheese in Salisbury. That’s always a huge blow to the senses and often leads me turning around in circles trying to keep an eye on the boys. There’s absolutely nothing calming about that place and the fact there are dozens of little guys and gals running around with reckless abandon can lead to rattled nerves.
Unlike at Frontier Town, due to a family reunion elsewhere, it was an even matchup on the family front, as Pam and I were there to corral both kids. Therefore, it was not nearly as challenging.
Things are always a little trickier when the boys have the advantage, and they certainly are well aware when that happens.

A short memory and thick skin are prerequisites for being a parent in my opinion.
That’s the only way to navigate this wild adventure that is parenting without having multiple nervous and emotional breakdowns each week.
I have thick skin because of my day job, but there are times when the kid’s words can hit where it hurts. Beckett is a master at that, although I don’t think he realizes it most of the time.
Beckett can speak with a forked tongue when he doesn’t get what he wants. For some reason, he seems to think if he’s mean that will lead to us giving him what he wants. Oftentimes, when I bring it up later, he refuses to acknowledge that he said it because he’s embarrassed.
If I didn’t have a short memory, I would never turn my back on Carson, thanks to his newfound throwing ability.
If I take him out to the yard to work on throwing the ball around, he will show little interest after a few tosses. However, on the beach one day recently, I was in a beach chair facing the water, and Pam was watching Carson fling beach toys nearby. At some point, he picked up a toy that was full of water and flung it about 15 feet, hitting me squarely in the back of the head. It was quite the throw, she later told me after I regained feeling in my right arm.
I should have known better because this is the same kid who last summer clocked me atop the head with a shovel when I had my back to him facing the ocean. He apparently does not like it when I turn my back to him. I am certainly learning it’s not in my best interest to do that anymore.

It can be scary when you can only hear your child and unable to see what he is doing.
That was the case the other night when I heard Beckett in the kitchen saying, “please, please, please don’t have any brown spots.”
From the other room, I worried what exactly he might be doing. When I got to him, I was relieved.
He was peeling a banana and hoping there would not be any bruises on it. He is adamantly opposed to bruises of any kind and, for some reason, has issues with eating a banana with any sort of “brown spots”.

Things I Like

Driving on the beach with the windows down

That ‘Homeland’ is back on

Sunny days off

Pictures of my kids hugging

Beach days in October

Leaving the office after a deadline

When a preconceived notion is wrong

Trying out a new restaurant

The smell of an old book

Polite teenagers

Booking winter trips

Thoughts From The Publisher’s Desk

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Even the most cynical among us would have to laud the success of this year’s pedestrian safety campaign in Ocean City. The statistics were reviewed this week, and they are nothing short of impressive.
Overall, pedestrian accidents were down 39 percent in Ocean City. Identified problem areas also saw reductions, including 40th to 62nd streets that saw five accidents this season compared to 12 last year, and south of 40th Street to the Inlet, 14 this year compared to 23. The tally for north of 62nd Street to the Delaware line held steady.
It’s difficult to cheer accident tallies of any consequence, but the fact is these are major decreases from a general perspective and the public safety effort as well as the infrastructure changes implemented deserve credit for making that happen.
Sure, some will say the wet weather during some stretches of the summer limited pedestrian volume as well as the fact crowds were down in general in Ocean City this summer, but I would argue the areas targeted this summer and labeled as problem areas were not impacted by those factors. There was still a high volume of pedestrians along the highway, particularly during the evening hours.
While this may seem cold, I look at pedestrian accidents as inevitable in Ocean City. There are a unique set of circumstances in Ocean City that combine to make for an unsafe place at times unless extreme caution is used. With common sense dulled by vacation tendencies, alcohol often impairing judgment and the limited infrastructure improvements available, the chance of accidents occurring among vehicles and pedestrians will always be high in Ocean City. That’s an inescapable fact.
Despite the uphill climb with lots to overcome, the end result from this summer was a huge increase in safety on resort roadways for pedestrians and vehicles. The numbers do not lie, and the agencies involved deserve credit for achieving a difference. The challenge will now be continuing this trend into the foreseeable future, and there is a story in this week’s paper about more infrastructure improvements planned for this off-season.

A bevy of new laws take effect on July 1 and Oct. 1 each year, and there are a couple involving driving to take note of before the end of the month.
The most high profile one involves cops now being able to pull over motorists spotted using hand-held cell phones while driving. Previously, it was a secondary offense, meaning officers who noticed someone driving and texting or talking on the phone could not pull the driver over just for that offense. Now if a cop sees a motorist at a stop sign talking on the phone or texting, that person can be pulled over and fined. The first-time offense is $75.
Another law change involves one that I already thought was a requirement — that all passengers in a vehicle must be retrained by a seat belt. Apparently, the law only applies currently to the driver and front-seat passenger. Now all passengers must be bucked up or be fined $50.

The concept of a Mid-Atlantic Amateur Sports Alliance being formed between Worcester and Wicomico counties and Ocean City is currently being discussed among tourism and government officials.
This week the concept was in the news, as Wicomico is looking to cement a contractual relationship with the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development (DBED) that will allow the county to apply for and accept funds to be spent on attracting and retaining amateur sports tournament and similar types of events.
The best example of this partnership working out of late was over the summer when the USSSA Girls World Series was held across the lower shore. At one point during the event, thousands of softball players converged on the Inlet in July for the opening of a leg of the multi-age event. The economic impact on the shore was considerable, and some retailers and hoteliers in Ocean City reported a bump from the event attendees as well.
This sort of partnership is an obvious direction to head, but surely there are details to be worked out. Most businesses in Ocean City feel significant impacts when youth sports are being held at Northside Park. The multiple-weekend soccer tournaments held in March are a prime example as well as the lacrosse tourneys held each summer at the facility.
The Ocean City Mayor and Council will soon weigh in on the partnership concept and that’s when more details will be known about what exactly this alliance will entail and what it could mean across the lower shore. Conceptually, it seems like a sound direction because the entire business community benefits from these large-scale youth sports events.

It was nearly impossible to escape the unmistakable roar of the bikers last weekend. I have no idea if the 200,000 bikers reported to be in the area is an accurate tally or not, but I can report you could hear the roar of the bikes from everywhere. Even the OSV area of Assateague Island was not immune from it.

I am looking forward to watching or taping the “Hotel Impossible” episode on Monday to see what transpired at the Lankford Hotel on 8th Street and the Boardwalk over the summer.
Several local faces should be featured on the show, including managers and owners of the old hotel as well as Joe Dashiell of Joseph T. Dashiell Builders, Inc., the main contractor for the work during the week-long project.
The show will air Monday at 10 p.m. on The Travel Channel.

Adventures Of Fatherhood

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It never ceases to amaze me how being a parent is like taking a day-long ride on the wildest roller coaster imaginable, featuring dips, turns, drops and highs and lows.
Over the course of the three-day Labor Day holiday weekend, we set out to give the kids a full blown summer weekend extravaganza before school kicked into gear, featuring long beach days, summer foods and a water park day, among other things.
Throughout the weekend, there were many fun, memorable times with our boys as well as plenty of regrettable, frustrating occasions. Here’s a rundown of some of the emotions experienced over the weekend:

Happy
With my boys, Beckett and Carson, there are plenty of “Life Is Good” times, and I try and embrace them because parenting is too hard and overwhelming at times not to bask in the glory of the wonderful moments.
For me, introducing my sons to the ocean and sharing my life-long love of it is about as good as it gets. It’s a passion of mine that I have not been able to enjoy with my sons until this summer.
As soon as we get to the beach each day, Beckett, 5, wants me to take him into the ocean or “into the deep” as he puts it. If he had his way, he would be in the ocean the entire time we are there. That makes two of us actually.
This was the first summer Beckett got to truly experience the ocean and the waves, and he has developed that critical respect for it. He has also developed a fascination with it that I identify with and adore.
It was a summer of many firsts for him in the water, including catching his first wave on a body board and several instances when he got tumbled hard by breaking waves. There’s nothing like getting smacked around a bit by some waves to give you an appreciation for the ocean.
With Carson, 3, his personality is a perfect balance to Beckett’s. Carson wants no part of the ocean when we first get out on the beach, but as the day progresses his courage grows and by the end he’s grabbing my hand and pulling me toward the ocean. Once we get to the ocean, he motions in his not-so-subtle, non-verbal way for me to put him on my shoulders. Once firmly in place, he demands I take him out into the ocean. Although I can’t see his face, I can tell from others around that he is all smiles.
Seeing the boys enjoying the ocean and beach makes me incredibly happy because we are going to be going to the ocean as often as we can and it will be a huge help if they enjoy it as much as their parents do.

Frustrated
Of course, there are maddening moments that frustrate me to end with parenting, and nothing does that more presently than when Beckett abuses his little brother.
There are times when Beckett should face criminal charges for what he does to Carson. In his defense, there are times when Carson instigates and seems to be seeking a violent response, but Beckett’s reaction all too often crosses the line.
An example of Carson’s instigative ways would be the other night when I found him pulling the cushion Beckett was sitting on out from underneath him on the couch, causing him to fall to the floor. I told him to stop and he didn’t listen. Beckett told him to stop and he refused, and instead of handling it in an appropriate way, Beckett pushed Carson down to the ground, rolled him over on to his stomach and tried to stand on his back. I was able to intervene and keep that from happening with Beckett alleging, “he deserves to have me jump on his back.”
As Carson ran into the other room, he slapped Beckett atop the head and me in the leg, leading Beckett to tackle him into a wall. I sent them both to their rooms at that point, while I searched in the refrigerator for something cold that might soothe my nerves.

Confused
There are days when neither kid can be satisfied, and it’s these confusing times that drive me crazy.
Neither wants to eat what is prepared for them. Neither wants to drink anything we have. Neither wants to go to the beach. Neither wants to swim in the pool. Neither wants to ride their bikes. Neither wants to do anything suggested.
It’s these perplexing sorts of days that also lead me to the fridge looking for something cold to ease my mind.

Proud
After the long and exhausting holiday weekend, Beckett woke up first on Tuesday, which was his first day of school.
It was a little after 5 and he made it quite clear he was ready by showing up in our room with his uniform shirt on. It was on backwards, but I couldn’t help feel a tremendous sense of pride in my boy. That was a great way to start the day.
He was anxious to go to school and I do not take that for granted, whether it’s the first day in the fall or in the middle of winter.
Later, as we walked into school for his first day as a kindergartener, it was impossible not to be proud and excited for him. I assume this is how it is for all parents, particularly at the early lower school age.
Last year, leaving school after dropping him off for pre-kindergarten, it was emotional. It was the same this year, but not quite as much. Instead, I was wondering if his shirt was still tucked in or not.